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Key speakers


Nick Heather Lecture 2018.

“Alcohol – still a balanced view? 30 years on from the landmark publication of the UK Royal College of General Practitioners. Where are we, and where do we need to go?”
Peter Anderson.

Resume
(Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, England; Faculty of Health, Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, Netherlands)

Professor Anderson has pioneered implementation and translational research on brief interventions for heavy drinking in primary health care. Whilst working with World Health Organization, he set up and managed the WHO worldwide Phase III and Phase IV studies on implementing brief interventions for hazardous and harmful alcohol consumption in primary care. The Phase IV study led on to the creation of INEBRIA, for which Professor Anderson is a past President. He was the author and lead coordinator of the FP7 European Commission co-financed ODHIN project which demonstrated the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of strategies to enhance health care provider behaviour in delivering screening and brief advice programmes in five European countries. He presently coordinates the SCALA project, scaling-up screening and brief advice programmes in Colombia, Mexico and Peru. He was an author of the UK Royal College of General Practitioners Report, “Alcohol – a Balanced View” (1986), the starting point of his presentation.


Plenary Session Conference.

“Cost-effectiveness of brief interventions on alcohol compared to other population-based alcohol policies”
Jürgen Rehm.

Resume
(Senior Director of the Institute for Mental Health Policy Research, CAMH; Senior Scientist in the Campbell Family Mental Health Research Institute at CAMH; Professor and Inaugural Chair of Addiction Policy in the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, Canada)

Dr. Rehm is a leader in generating and analyzing the scientific data needed to inform clinicians and policy-makers of strategies to reduce alcohol-, tobacco-, and other drug-related harm. His recent research has more and more included interactions between socio-economic status, poverty and substance use, including analysis of policies and interventions with respect to reducing or increasing inequalities. Dr. Rehm is a leader in generating and analyzing the scientific data needed to inform clinicians and policy-makers of strategies to reduce alcohol-, tobacco-, and other drug-related harm. His recent research has more and more included interactions between socio-economic status, poverty and substance use, including analysis of policies and interventions with respect to reducing or increasing inequalities. His work has been awarded with numerous awards and prizes, most importantly, the Jellinek Memorial Award (2003) and the European Addiction Research Award (2017).


Plenary Session Panel.

“Challenges faced on the implementation of Brief Interventions in Lower-Middle Income Countries and Latin America”.

Abhijit Nadkarni.

Resume
(Co-Director Addictions Research Group, Sangath, Goa, India; Health Services & Population Research Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology, & Neuroscience, King’s College London, UK; South London & Maudsley NHS Trust, UK)

Dr. Nadkarni is an addictions psychiatrist and global mental health researcher. He is currently based in Sangath, Goa (India), where he is the Director of the Addictions Research Group. His research interests encompass global mental health, particularly alcohol use disorders in low resource settings.
Currently, he is leading or collaborating on several projects in India funded by grants from MRC-UK, NIHR-UK, and Wellcome-DBT. These include projects as diverse as examining the burden of domestic violence related to alcohol use, and developing and evaluating technology based interventions for alcohol use disorders and tobacco use. Abhijit is actively involved in the capacity building of mental health researchers and lay health workers. He tutors on the MSc in Global Mental Health, and Leadership in Mental Health courses for the Pacific Islands and Eastern Mediterranean region. He is the also the Course Director on the Leadership in Mental Health, Sangath’s flagship annual international short course in Goa. He continues to train lay health workers in community-based mental health care programmes at several sites in India, and Nepal. He is a member of Government of India’s Ministry of Health and Family Welfare’s task force to develop operational guidelines for the integration of mental healthcare services into a comprehensive primary health care service package.


Plenary Session Panel.

“Challenges faced on the implementation of Brief Interventions in Lower-Middle Income Countries and Latin America”.

Telmo Ronzani.

Resume
(Chair of Center for Research, Intervention and Evaluation for Alcohol & Drugs – CREPEIA, Department of Psychology, Federal University of Juiz de Fora, Brazil).

Dr. Ronzani is Psychologist, PhD in Health Science from the Federal University of São Paulo and Post-doctoral Training from the University of Connecticut Health Center (USA). Is Professor of the Department of Psychology of the Federal University of Juiz de Fora (UFJF), Brazil, and Chair of the Center for Research, Intervention and Evaluation for Alcohol and Drugs (CREPEIA).
He is the editor of the recently published book “Drugs and social context. Social perspectives on the use of alcohol and other drugs” (2018). In this work, a social and multidisciplinary approach challenges the dichotomy between a purely medical perspective (focused mainly on treatment techniques) or to a criminological perspective (focused mainly on drug trafficking and organized crime), analysing both the social contexts to which drug use is related and the social and political consequences of the attitudes and policies adopted by governments and other social groups towards drug users. The book addresses topics such as drugs and poverty, drugs and gender, drugs and race, drugs and territory, stigmatization of drug use and prohibitionism.